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14,000 Street Trees WORKING FOR YOU


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14,000 Street Trees WORKING FOR YOU


Whether it’s the leafy green of summer or the myriad of fall colors, Bexley’s tree canopy provides both beauty and the perfect accent to our fine collection of houses and other buildings.  But Bexley’s trees contribute to the health and sustainability of our community in many other ways:

  • ·      Bexley’s 14,000 street trees help create and foster pedestrian activity which in turn studies show lead to increased safety.
  • ·      Other studies reveal that tree lined streets add a  $10,000 – $20,000 premium to real estate values.
  • ·      The quality of the air that we breathe is made cleaner by the trees’ removal of CO2 from the air.
  • ·      Bexley’s storm drainage runoff is greatly reduced due to the street trees absorbing this water.

The summer shade of Bexley’s street trees helps  to cool the streets reducing the sun’s damage and extending the life of the pavement,  therefore reducing costs. The trees keep the birds eating and singing, providing source of food, perches, and nests.

So go ahead, and hug a tree today – they deserve it!

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The Mighty Oaks


The Mighty Oaks


White Oak- A broad, open crown above a short trunk has descending lower branches. Thew gray-brown bark sheds in ragged flakes from young trees, and is deeply furrowed when mature. Shade tolerance is intermediate and growth rate is moderate after a slow start.

Scarlet Oak- Scarlet oak is a large tree with a rounded, open habit which eventually matures to 70' tall. Leaves are 3-6" long and deeply cut with bristle-tipped, pointed lobes. Foliage is a glossy green in summer turning to scarlet in fall.

Shingle Oak- The species has performed well as a street tree in the Midwest on sites that have adequate space. Growth rate is slow to medium. Lower branches of older trees tend to droop. Leaves of young trees commonly persist through the winter. 

Bur Oak- A massive tree with stout branching when mature, it occurs on alkaline soils in the central U.S. and the Greak Plains region, and in portions of Canada and northeastern states. The dark gray bark becmoes rough and deeply furrowed with age. This member of the white oak group slowly and is intolerant of shade. 

Chinkapin Oak- Chinkapin (or Chinquapin) oak is a medium sized deciduous oak of the white oak group that typically grows 40-60’ (less frequently to 80’) tall with an open globular crown. It is native to central and eastern North America where it is typically found on dry upland sites often in rocky, alkaline soils. Insignificant monoecious yellowish-green flowers in separate male and female catkins appear in spring as the leaves emerge. Fruits are small oval acorns (to 3/4” long), with scaly cups that extend to approximately 1/2 the acorn length.

Pin Oak- The shape and growth habit are different from most other oaks. It has a dominant central leader and numerous branches; upper ones are upright, and lower branches are descending. It occurs naturally on moist or wet sites in central and eastern U.S. The smooth, dark gray bark becomes fissured with age. Leaves of young trees commonly persist through the winter. Growth ratre is medium to fast, and it is intolerant of shade. 

Willow Oak- A bottomland species of southern U.S., its range extends into Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The growth habit resembles pink oak, except lower branches are not as descending. It has fast growth and is moderately intolerant of shade. 

Northern Red Oak- A stately, fast growing tree native to moist sites in the eastern half of the U.S., extending into Canada but not the deep South. Dark gray bark, smooth at first, becomes furrowed with age. Moderately intolerant of shade. 

Shumard Oak- A stately tree that is native to moist sites in souther and southeastern U.S., extending northward into southern Michigan and Pennsylvania. The dark gray bark is smooth at first, then becomes furrowed with age. It is moderately intolerant of shade. Growth rate is moderate to fast. 

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The Magnificent Maples


The Magnificent Maples


Sugar Maple- Selected in Illinois and introduced in 1983. It has rapid growth, dark green leaves, and dense branching.

Red Maple- A colorful tree year round, with gray bark, subtle displays of flowers and fruit in the spring, and brilliant splashes of red and yellow in the autumn. Native to much of the eastern U.S. and Canada, with much variation among seed sources. 

Shantung Maple- A naturally occuring hybrid of Shantung maple and Norway maple selected in Oregon for fall color, branching, and fast growth. Has uniform branching and crown shape. Introduced in 1989.

Norway Maple- A wide-ranging species in Europe and western Asia that has been planted in many parts of North America. There is much variation in size, shape, and leaf color. Moderate to vigorous grow rate on various site conditions.